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WWW Phy-Astr Department
 

Department of Physics and Astronomy
400 Science Annex, 404/413-6033
http://www.Phy-Astr.gsu.edu

H. Richard Miller, Chair

Dr. A. G. Unil Perera, Associate Chair

David Wingert, Brian Thoms, Undergraduate Directors

Faculty:
Bagnuolo, Ershov, Gies, Hartkopf, Hastings, He, Hsu, Manson, McAlister, Miller, Nave,
Nelson, Perera, Shure, Stockman, Thoms, Wiita, Wingert

All degree programs described below are built on a core of 21 semester hours of physics numbered 3400 or above and provide a strong background in mathematics.

The standard program is designed to prepare the student for graduate school or immediate employment upon graduation. Students selecting the standard program must complete 12 semester hours of physics beyond the core courses and must complete other technical courses as described in the "Degree Requirements" section.

As an alternative to the standard program, courses in one of several specific areas of concentration may be chosen in addition to the physics core described in the "Degree Requirements" section. The available areas of concentration are Applied Physics, Astronomy, Pre-Medicine, Biophysics, core described in the "Degree Requirements" section. The available areas of concentration are Applied Physics, Astronomy, Pre-Medicine, Biophysics, Geology, and Computer Science.

Early consultation with the chair of the Department of Physics and Astronomy or the student's department advisor for the purpose of tentatively scheduling an effective program of study is very important. Physics majors should pay special attention to the early completion of the mathematical requirements if they are to complete their physics requirements during the usual four-year span. The first calculus course should be taken during the freshman year and the second and third calculus courses should be completed during the sophomore year. It is recommended that Chemical Principles I and II be taken during the freshman year. The beginning physics sequence (Physics 2211K-2212K) should be completed before the end of the sophomore year. Students who enter the physics major after completing a non-calculus-level elementary physics sequence will not be required to take Physics 2211K-2212K but should complete Physics 3150 before taking more advanced courses in physics.

Degree Requirements

    Degree offered:
      Bachelor of Science
        Major in Physics
          Concentration in Applied Physics
          Concentration in Astronomy
          Concentration in Biophysics
          Concentration in Computer Science
          Concentration in Geology
          Concentration in Pre-Medicine
Majors should complete the following:

1. "Undergraduate Core Curriculum," previously described (specific recommendations listed below);
2. "Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major," listed below;
3. "Major Courses," listed below; and
4. "Minor and/or Additional Courses," listed below, if needed.

Area A: Essential Skills (9)

    Required course:
    Math 1113. Precalculus (or a higher level mathematics course) (3)
Area B: Institutional Options (4)

Area C: Humanities and Fine Arts (6)

Area D: Science, Mathematics, and Technology (11)

    Required course:
    Math 2211. Calculus of One Variable I (or a higher level mathematics course) (4)


Math 2211. Calculus of One Variable I (or a higher level mathematics course) (4)

Area E: Social Science (12)

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

1. Required Courses (16)

    Phys 2211K. Principles of Physics I (4)
    Phys 2212K. Principles of Physics II (4)
    Chem 1211K. General Chemistry I (4)
    Chem 1212K. General Chemistry II (4)
    Math 2211. Calculus of One Variable I (4)
    Math 2212. Calculus of One Variable II (4)
    Math 2215. Multivariate Calculus (4)
2. Select one course. (2)
    Biol 1107K. Principles of Biology I (4)
    Geol 1121K. Introductory Geosciences I: Earth's Internal Processes (4)
    CSc 2310. Principles of Computer Programming I (3)
    CSc 2310. Principles of Computer Programming I (3)

    Note: Of the additional 13-14 hours, 11 count towards Area D, and 2-3 count towards the Major.

Major Courses

(A grade of "C" or better is required in all major courses.)

The Department of Physics and Astronomy offers several concentrations within the B.S. degree program for the physics major. The standard program is recommended for those who plan to pursue graduate study in physics. Other options include concentrations in applied physics, astronomy, pre-medicine, biophysics, geology, and computer science. Detailed information on each of the options is available in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. The requirements listed below for each of the options are in addition to the courses listed under Area F. The standard program and all concentrations are centered on the 21-hour core of physics courses and the nine-hour core of mathematics courses listed below.

Physics Core (21)

1. Physics Requirements (16)

    Phys 3401. Modern Physics I (4)
    Phys 3402. Modern Physics II (3)
    Phys 3901. Modern Physics Laboratory I (1)
    Phys 3902. Modern Physics Laboratory II (1)
    Phys 4600. Classical Mechanics (3)
    Phys 4700. Electricity and Magnetism (3)
    Phys 4950. Senior Research (1)
2. Select one course. (3)
    Phys 3800. Optics (3)
    Phys 3850. Statistical and Thermal Physics (3)
3. Select two physics or astronomy laboratory courses at the 4000 level. (2)

Mathematics Core (9)

Mathematics Requirements (9)

    Math 3260. Differential Equations (3)
    Math 4258. Vector Calculus (3)
    Math 4265. Partial Differential Equations (3)
Standard Program in Physics (23)

To meet the requirements for the degree with the standard program, the required physics and mathematics courses must be completed along with additional physics and mathematics courses as described below:

1. Standard Program Courses. Select twelve hours of courses. (12)

    Phys 3500. Electronics (3)
    Phys 3510. Digital Instrumentation (3)
    Phys 3800. Optics (3)
    Phys 3850. Statistical and Thermal Physics (3)
    Phys 4410. Introduction to Nuclear and Particle Physics (3)
    Phys 4810. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics (3)
    Phys 4910. Solid State Physics (3)
    Phys 4950. Senior Research (1-3) (up to three hours maximum)
    Astr 3500. Fundamentals of Astronomy and Astrophysics (4)
    Astr 4000. Fundamentals of Astrophysics (3)
    Astr 4100. Astronomical Techniques and Instrumentation (3)
    Select one physics or astronomy laboratory course at the 4000 level. (1)
2. Mathematics Courses: Select one course. (3)
    Math 3435. Linear Algebra 3435 (3)
    Math 4250. Complex Analysis 4250 (3)
 3. Select eight hours of courses at the 2000-level or above in mathematics, computer science, astronomy, biology, geology, chemistry, or physics. (Consult with departmental advisor.) (8)

Applied Physics Concentration (23)

In addition to the core courses in physics and mathematics, the applied physics concentration allows courses from other sciences and engineering to complete the program in physics-related areas. (Engineering courses are available through joint enrollment at the Georgia Institute of Technology.) At least 15 hours must be at the 3000-level or above, and at least 10 hours must be taken in other departments. The overall program must be developed in consultation with an academic advisor within the Department of Physics and Astronomy.

Astronomy Concentration (23)

In addition to the core courses in physics and mathematics, the astronomy concentration allows 11 hours of astronomy courses (Astr 3500, 4000, 4010, and 4100), and others from the list below, to complete the requirements for the degree.

1. Astronomy Requirements (11)

    Astr 3500. Fundamentals of Astronomy and Astrophysics (4)
    Astr 4000. Fundamentals of Astrophysics (3)
    Astr 4100. Astronomical Techniques and Instrumentation (3)
    Astr 4010 Astronomical Methods Laboratory (1)
 2. Physics Courses: Select four hours. (4)
    Phys 3500. Electronics (3)
    Phys 3510. Digital Instrumentation (3)
    Phys 3800. Optics (3)
    Phys 3510. Digital Instrumentation (3)
    Phys 3800. Optics (3)
    Phys 3850 Statistical and Thermal Physics (3)
    Phys 4410. Introduction to Nuclear and Particle Physics (3)
    Phys 4810. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics (3)
    Phys 4910. Solid State Physics (3)
    Phys 4950. Senior Research (1-3) (up to three hours maximum)
    Select one physics or astronomy laboratory course at the 4000 level. (1)
    Math 3435. Linear Algebra 3435 (3)
    Math 4250. Complex Analysis 4250 (3)
 4. Select eight hours of courses at the 2000-level or above in mathematics, computer science, astronomy, biology, geology, chemistry or physics (consult with departmental advisor). (8)

Pre-Medicine Concentration (23)

In addition to the physics and mathematics core, the pre-medicine concentration allows courses from biology and chemistry to complete the requirements for the degree. The concentration also provides the minimum requirements of physics, chemistry, and biology for admission to most medical schools. Courses should be chosen from the list below.

1. Pre-Medicine Requirements (22)

    Biol 1107K. Principles of Biology I (4)
    Biol 1108K. Principles of Biology II (4)
    Biol 3880. Microbiology (3)
    Biol 3890. Microbiology Laboratory (1)
    Chem 2400. Organic Chemistry I (4)
    Chem 3410. Organic Chemistry II (4)
    Chem 3100. Organic Laboratory I (1)
    Chem 3110. Organic Laboratory II (1)
 2. Science Elective (consult with departmental advisor) (1)

Biophysics Concentration (25)

In addition to the core courses in physics and mathematics, the biophysics concentration allows biology and chemistry courses to complete the requirements for the degree. The courses should be chosen from the list below and provide background in several areas including biochemical, biomolecular, and neural sciences. This concentration provides excellent preparation for advanced study in biological physics and for admission to M.D./Ph.D. Programs.

1. Required courses (12)

    Biol 1107K. Principles of Biology I (4)
    Biol 1108K. Principles of Biology II (4)
    Chem 2400. Organic Chemistry I (4)
 2. Select thirteen hours. (Note that Chem 3410, Organic Chemistry II, is a prerequisite for many other courses in the list.) (13)
    Chem 3100. Organic Laboratory I (1)
    Chem 3110. Organic Laboratory II (1)
    Chem 3410. Organic Chemistry II (4)
    Chem 4000. Chemical Analysis (3)
    Chem 4110. Physical Chemistry I (4)
    Chem 4600. Biochemistry I (5)
    Chem 4620. Biochemistry I Laboratory (2)
    Chem 4840. Bioenergetics (3)
    Biol 3800. Molecular Biology (3)
    Biol 3810. Molecular Biology Laboratory (1)
    Biol 3840. Animal Biology (3)
    Biol 3850. Animal Biology Laboratory (1)
    Biol 3880. Microbiology (3)
    Biol 3890. Microbiology Laboratory (1)
    Biol 3900. Genetics (3)
    Biol 3910. Genetics Laboratory (1)
    Biol 4102. Introduction to Neurobiology (3)
    Biol 4180. Neurobiology Laboratory (3)
    Phys 3500. Electronics (3)
Geology Concentration (24)

In addition to core courses in physics and mathematics, this concentration allows geology courses to complete the requirements for the degree. The courses should be chosen from the list below.

1. Geology Requirements (16)

    Geol 1121K. Introductory Geoscience I (4)
    Geol 1122K. Introductory Geoscience II (4)
    Geol 3002. Introduction to Earth Minerals (4)
    Geol 3003. Structural Geology and Tectonics (4)
 2. Select one course. (4)
    Geol 3004. Environmental Geology (4)
    Geol 4004. Optical Mineralogy and Petrology (4)
    Geol 4007. Hydrogeology (4)
    Geol 4001. Soil, Clays, and Weathering (4)


3. Select one additional course from group 2 above or in courses at the 2000-level or above in mathematics, computer science, astronomy, physics, biology, geology, or chemistry. (4)

Computer Science Concentration (24)

In addition to the core courses in physics and mathematics, this option allows courses in computer science and related areas to complete the requirements for the degree. The courses should be chosen from the list below.

1. Computer Science Requirements (21)

    Phys 3500. Electronics (3)
    1. Computer Science Requirements (21)
      Phys 3500. Electronics (3)
      CSc 2310. Principles of Computer Programming I (3)
      CSc 2311. Principles of Programming II (3)
      CSc 3410. Data Structures (3)
      CSc 4610. Numerical Analysis I (3)
      CSc 4730. Data Visualization (3)
      Math 3435. Linear Algebra (3)
     2. Select one course from the list below: (3)
      Math 3030. Mathematical Models for Computer Science (3)
      CSc 3210. Computer Organization and Programming (3)
      CSc 4210. Computer Architecture (3)
      CSc 4310. Introduction to Parallel Programming (3)
      CSc 4620. Numerical Analysis II (3)
      CSc 4820. Computer Graphics Algorithms (3)
      Phys 3510. Digital Instrumentation (3)


    Minor and/or Additional Courses

    1. Students earning a B.S. through the Department of Physics and Astronomy are not required to take a minor.

    2. Additional courses not in the major must be taken as electives to complete a minimum of 120 semester hours, exclusive of 1000/2000 physical education or military science courses.
     

    Minor Offerings

    Students who wish to minor in physics (including astronomy) must take 15-18 hours in courses in the specific program, including at least 9 semester hours at the 3000 level or above. Students taking more than 15 hours in courses in the program may count the additional hours toward their electives or may consider completing a double major. (A grade of "C" or better is required in all courses counting toward the minor.)
     

    Residency Requirement

    A minimum of 39 semester hours in courses numbered 3000 or above completed in residence at Georgia State University with an average grade of "C" or better is required.
     

    Secondary Education

    Students who seek a license to teach science in grades 7-12 upon the completion of their undergraduate studies must do so through the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies program for Broad Field Science. For information on application procedures to the B.I.S. programs, refer to the section in this chapter concerning "Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies."
     
     

    Elementary Science Education Partners

    Course 4920, ESEP, in the departments of Biology, Chemistry, Geology, Physics and Astronomy, is designed for the junior or senior who wishes to apply their scientific expertise in a practical way by helping an elementary school teacher with hands-on science activities. One credit hour may be earned in a given semester. Registration for the course must be approved by the ESEP local coordinator, Department of Geology, and the dean of the college. Forms for course 4920 must be completed at the time of regular registration for the semester in which the student is to be enrolled in 4920 and can be obtained from the local coordinator. Course 4920 may be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.
     

    Honors Program

    The department encourages qualified students to participate in the Honor's Program. (See "Honors Program" previously described.)

     

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